Glimpsed in between

Bitter-sweet news. The Gauteng High Court in South Africa on Thursday granted a terminally-ill Cape Town man the right to end his own life with the help of a doctor. In an unprecedented ruling, advocate Robin Stransham-Ford was granted an order that allowed a doctor to help him commit suicide without the threat of prosecution or disciplinary action.

Robin Stransham-Ford died surrounded by relatives and caregivers on Thursday, just hours before the High Court in Pretoria granted his request to die with the help of a doctor.

Ann Kjellberg on Brodsky’s self-translations:

A master of an artistic medium comes to us from another language. He embraces our culture and our verse. He dedicates much of his short life to struggling mightily to rewrite his own work so that it can be read and understood by his compatriots. (This in contrast with Nabokov, an oft-mentioned comparison. Nabokov not only grew up speaking English in his aristocratic Saint Petersburg household; he abandoned composition in Russian to become an English-language writer. Brodsky remained primarily a Russian poet, crossing over into English and crossing back and embracing a bilingual literary career.) Should we reject this effort on the grounds of unfamiliarity alone? Or should we perhaps consider that Brodsky brings us important news that might enrich our tradition, which is currently suffering from an undeniable diminution of means? Should we consider whether the challenges that Brodsky’s English verse offer us may themselves be an indication of how our language and our receptivity have contracted? Might it be worth searching for the inner cadences and harmonies in what at first seems startling to us? Or asking ourselves how an apparent violation of convention might create a more muscular or versatile poetic medium?

Found in passing

Main Street, Umtali

Via whiskey river

“Listen: you are not yourself, you are crowds of others, you are as leaky a vessel as was ever made, you have spent vast amounts of your life as someone else, as people who died long ago, as people who never lived, as strangers you never met. The usual I we are given has all the tidy containment of the kind of character the realist novel specializes in and none of the porousness of our every waking moment, the loose threads, the strange dreams, the forgettings and misrememberings, the portions of a life lived through others’ stories, the incoherence and inconsistency, the pantheon of dei ex machina and the companionability of ghosts. There are other ways of telling.”
– Rebecca Solnit
The Faraway Nearby

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